Support needed for feral cats, those who help them
by Anne Marie Fuller / For The Tracy Press
May 31, 2013 | 3645 views | 2 2 comments | 31 31 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A male feral cat waits in a cage after being trapped by the trap, neuter and release program founded by Tracy resident Kim Gray. Photo by Anne Marie Fuller
A male feral cat waits in a cage after being trapped by the trap, neuter and release program founded by Tracy resident Kim Gray. Photo by Anne Marie Fuller
slideshow
Tracy resident Kim Gray, founder of Animal Rescue of Tracy and the local feral cat trap, neuter and release program, helps Veterinary Technician Lisa Goodin of Grantline Veterinary Hospital remove a male feral cat that was trapped as part of the program. Photo by Anne Marie Fuller
Tracy resident Kim Gray, founder of Animal Rescue of Tracy and the local feral cat trap, neuter and release program, helps Veterinary Technician Lisa Goodin of Grantline Veterinary Hospital remove a male feral cat that was trapped as part of the program. Photo by Anne Marie Fuller
slideshow
Kitten season is booming due to an increasing population of feral cats and also of “community cats” — animals that once had owners but have been abandoned.

Kim Gray, founder of Animal Rescue of Tracy, has been overwhelmed with calls from the local community to help trap, neuter or spay and release such cats.

Gray started a local feral cat program seven years ago and has handled 3,000 cats since then.

“About 50 percent of the cats I bring in to be fixed were once owned by someone,” Gray said. “Because of the current housing situation, many people are losing their homes and just leave their cats behind.

Feral cats that are trapped and taken to the animal shelter are not adoptable according to the California Food and Agricultural code section 31752.5. After three days from the date of impound, the cats are euthanized.

Trapping and releasing allows the cat to live out its life and not add to the feral population.

Lisa Goodin, a veterinary technician at Grant Line Vet, said the “program helps in so many ways.”

“We know it helps with the feral cat overpopulation problem, but it also helps with the health of the cats,” she said. “When cats are fixed, they are less likely to fight and spread diseases. They are also less likely to spray and become a nuisance.”

Gray takes each cat to a participating vet and then returns the cat to the area where it was trapped.

An average week could see 25 cats trapped around town, and as of this week, Gray had a list of 248 cats to trap and fix.

As she tries to keep up with the increasing number of feral cats, Gray is asking for help from volunteers and monetary donations. In addition to traps, money is spent on cat food, medicine, towels and fuel to transport the animals.

Donations for the feral cat program can be dropped off at Animal Rescue of Tracy in the Macy’s wing of the West Valley Mall, 3200 Naglee Road, from 11 to 4 p.m. Saturdays or noon to 4 p.m. Sundays. Gray can be reached at 609-8220.

• Contact the Tracy Press newsroom at 830-4280 or tpnews@tracypress.com.
Comments
(2)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
newtotracy
|
May 31, 2013
these folks do a GREAT service cleaning up after those who just throw away their former pets. I know that sometimes it's not totally a choice, but I would make sure that my pets go with me no matter the circumstance...and if for some reason they couldn't...I would do right by them rather than just leave them.

I believe it's Kim's organization that has helped my neighborhood neuter 2 toms and hopefully spay a female if we can catch the little minx!

as much as I'm not a fan of the mall on weekends...I think I'll try to bring in some donations this weekend...they're doing a great job taking care of "throwaways!"

and suggestions of donating bullets is simply asinine and inhumane.
TracyRAP
|
May 31, 2013
I'll donate a case of .22lr :0


We encourage readers to share online comments in this forum, but please keep them respectful and constructive. This is not a space for personal attacks, libelous statements, profanity or racist slurs. Comments that stray from the topic of the story or are found to contain abusive language are subject to removal at the Press’ discretion, and the writer responsible will be subject to being blocked from making further comments and have their past comments deleted. Readers may report inappropriate comments by e-mailing the editor at tpnews@tracypress.com.