Weekend soaking could be last hurrah for wet weather
by Joel Danoy
Apr 05, 2013 | 2769 views | 2 2 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Cars drive through about 2 feet of water on 11th St. at the intersection of 10th St. on Sunday around 6:45 p.m. Thunderstorms brought downpours this afternoon that have caused 2-3 feet of standing water in several intersections and roadways. Joel Danoy/Tracy Press
Cars drive through about 2 feet of water on 11th St. at the intersection of 10th St. on Sunday around 6:45 p.m. Thunderstorms brought downpours this afternoon that have caused 2-3 feet of standing water in several intersections and roadways. Joel Danoy/Tracy Press
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The rain and thunderstorms that brought more than a half-inch of rain to Tracy this week could be the last chances for measurable rainfall until the fall.

George Quan, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Sacramento, said Wednesday, April 3, that the chances for storm systems to move into the area will dissipate “greatly” in the “next few weeks.”

About 0.64 inches of rain was recorded in Tracy on Sunday, March 31, when downpours from thunderstorms caused temporary flooding at intersections and in roadways around the city.

The Tracy Police Department received at least 16 calls for flooding from about 5:15 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday, according to the department’s call log.

“The weekend storms gave the area a good soaking,” Quan said, “but as we get to the end of April, we might get a half-inch more to our rain total, but that would be the upper limits.”

As of noon Thursday, April 4, Tracy had received 8.27 inches of rain since July 1. Tracy typically receives 10.5 inches of precipitation from July to June.

The recent rains are doing little to supplement California water reservoirs, which rely on a deep snow pack in the Sierras to replenish supplies each year.

A Department of Water Resources snow survey released March 28 found the water content in California’s snowpack to be 52 percent of its normal rate, and the spring melt is already occurring.

“With most of the wet season behind us, this is more gloomy news for our summer water supply,” said Mark Cowin, DWR director.

Snowmelt typically supplies “about a third of the water for California’s homes and farms as it melts into streams,” according to a press release from the DWR regarding the report.

Storms in November and December built the snow pack water content to 134 percent of normal Jan. 2, the release states.

However, January, February and March were the driest months on record for the state, which greatly decreased the snowpack to the present levels, the release states.

n Contact Joel Danoy at 830-4229 or jdanoy@tracypress.com.
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Macpup
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April 08, 2013
As California sets up the drought scenario, the federal government is working to destroy hydroelectric dams on the Klamath River in the name of fish! Besides being the best form of "green energy", dams are our reserve against drought. Again, the government isn't really concerned about conserving energy and being green. http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/Remove-4-dams-on-Klamath-study-urges-4411365.php


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