Lammersville Unified to regulate ads on fences
by Denise Ellen Rizzo
Jun 20, 2014 | 3183 views | 0 0 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A tattered sign advertising a youth football program could be seen hanging off a Wicklund School fence on Wednesday. Lammersville Unified School District leaders are reviewing possible rules for advertisements posted on school fences, including size and maintenance requirements. Denise Ellen Rizzo/Tracy Press
A tattered sign advertising a youth football program could be seen hanging off a Wicklund School fence on Wednesday. Lammersville Unified School District leaders are reviewing possible rules for advertisements posted on school fences, including size and maintenance requirements. Denise Ellen Rizzo/Tracy Press
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On Wednesday, signs of various sizes could be seen hanging on the Wicklund School fence, advertising a soccer program and a community event. Lammersville Unified School District leaders are working on rules for the types of advertising signs allowed on school fences. A draft policy will be presented to the board July 16. Denise Ellen Rizzo/Tracy Press
On Wednesday, signs of various sizes could be seen hanging on the Wicklund School fence, advertising a soccer program and a community event. Lammersville Unified School District leaders are working on rules for the types of advertising signs allowed on school fences. A draft policy will be presented to the board July 16. Denise Ellen Rizzo/Tracy Press
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MOUNTAIN HOUSE — Signs of varying sizes and conditions hanging on school fences have provoked the Lammersville Unified School District Governing Board to create a policy to regulate advertisements.

At their Wednesday meeting, the members of the board directed the district staff to draft a set of rules for advertisement signs on school property, as well as billboards and paid advertisements in school-sponsored publications, such as yearbooks.

Matthew Balzarini told the rest of the board that he saw several banners on the fence at Wicklund School, and it “looked bad.”

He suggested establishing standards for advertisements that would include size, method of attachment and maintenance requirements.

Board member Sharon Lampel initially wanted to create a subcommittee of two members of the board and possibly representatives of school booster clubs. She withdrew the recommendation after Mountain House High School Principal Ben Fobert, speaking as a resident, suggested that the superintendent and not the board should set the policy.

Lampel said the important thing was to avoid a situation in which groups would display larger and larger banners at local schools to make their causes stand out.

“Our fences are not a competition,” she said.

Superintendent Kirk Nicholas said he would look into creating an administrative regulation and would present his findings at the next board meeting, July 16.

Leasing of musical instruments approved

The board voted unanimously Wednesday to authorize funds to lease 112 musical instruments for students throughout the district.

The superintendent told the board that the $156,000 expense would be spread over a few years as an affordable way for the district to build its stock of musical instruments.

“We’re leasing to get more instruments in the hands of kids K through 12,” Nicholas said. “If we can get the instruments approved, we can get them in the system and distributed the best way possible.”

At the end of the lease period, the district can buy the instruments for $1 each, according to Fobert, the high school principal.

Alvina Keyser, LUSD chief business official, told the trustees that leasing was the most cost-effective way to get instruments. She said the cost had already been built into the district budget for the next three years.

Nicholas said he didn’t have a music education program in place yet, but he was working on one.

The instruments on the leasing list included a variety of drums, clarinets, bassoons, oboes and tubas.

According to Troy Rexelle, music consultant for the district, those are “standard for school instruments.”

“We wanted instruments that would not last a year, but years, and affect hundreds to thousands of students,” Rexelle said.

Fobert, the high school principal, told the trustees that the first step in building a high school program was to have enough instruments. He said the goal was to put them into the hands of students, helping them develop a love of music.

“It lays the groundwork for a music program,” he said.

• Contact Denise Ellen Rizzo at drizzo@tracypress.com or 830-4225. 

 
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